Report 13/2/15

Lynton 'Heff' Heffer
Ph: 07 4098 5354
info@fishingportdouglas.com.au
www.fishingportdouglas.com.au
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Report 13/2/15

Post by subeditor » Fri Feb 13, 2015 9:59 am

We are almost into the second week of the barra season and reports have been steady with the most notable catches occuring down towards the headlands, beaches and estaury and river mouths. It is most commonly thought that the fish have remained in these areas and are still awaiting a good flood to aid their breeding processes. Also barramundi eggs and larvae will only survive in salt water and for this reason all breeding takes place in river mouths and bays near areas of suitable nursery habitat. There’s been some nice reports of barra being caught just over 90cm which is a big fish for this region with most averaging around the 70-80cm mark. Any fish over 80cm is considered to be a breeding female and with today’s views on fishing, many anglers will release these big breeders to help assist our stock numbers which are arguably thin. According to long term locals and certain guides the big fish have been caught using live mullet with lures and soft plastics also accounting for several fish. Spawning takes place at night around the time of the slack tide and appears to be related to the lunar cycle. The nights following full and new moons are the periods of greatest spawning activity and we have a full moon this coming Saturday night so one may look at their schedule following this if they are really keen to get amongst the barra action. The winds look like they will be more conducive which will hopefully clear up the water which has been filthy of late.
Once the females have decided to lay their eggs, which usually coincides with a big rain, they appear pinkish when water hardened. The eggs hatch within 15-20 hours at which time the larvae are around 1.5 mm in length and the mouth and eyes are well developed, although the yolk sac is large. At 2.5 mm the mouth is large and open, the yolk sac is greatly reduced and the pectoral fins are beginning to develop. Above this size the larvae begin to exhibit the characteristic colouration of juveniles of this species - overall brown mottled markings with a white stripes running lengthwise along the head. At 3.5 mm the yolk sac is all but gone, fin rays are beginning to appear and the teeth are well developed. By the fifth day the yolk sac has been completely absorbed and by 8.5 mm the fins are fully developed. Once life has begun these small juveniles will make their way upstream to the fresh and brackish waters where they’ll stay for a few years putting on size and attitude. Growth rates are variable, but generally rapid as they have a vivacious appetite. Average overall lengths at the end of each year are as follows:
Year = Length range (mm)
1 = 310-330
2 = 430-500
3 = 529-610
4 = 610-690
5 = 730-770
6 = 810+

Lynton Heffer
Ph: 0409 610 869
http://www.fishingportdouglas.com.au
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PortDougTrev5215.JPG
Gold Spot and Tea-Leaf Trevally have been a common catch on the reef for quite sometime

subeditor
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Posts: 1449
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Re: Report 13/2/15

Post by subeditor » Fri Feb 13, 2015 9:59 am

***Please do not reply to this fishing report with a question, as the contributor does not monitor the bulletin boards. If you have a question, please contact the contributor directly on the contact details at the end of the report.***

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