28/9/06 Weekly Report

Brad & Lisa Andrew
Great Lakes Tackle
Shop 1, 1-9 Manning St (Cnr Kent St)
Tuncurry 2428
Ph 6554 9541
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Tony Zann
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Joined: Fri Dec 19, 2008 1:21 pm

28/9/06 Weekly Report

Post by Tony Zann » Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:08 am

Offshore: A little over a week ago one local game boat working well wide of Seal Rocks encountered a dead whale which had attracted, among other things, several mahi mahi around 25kg, a cobia and, of course, sharks. Since that time we have been plagued with less than perfect weather and little opportunity to get out wide. Some trailer boats and charter operators have had small windows of opportunity to check out the reefs. Big pearl perch remain a feature along with lots of small snapper. Dare I say it, the leatherjackets seem to have thinned out. A few big kings and the occasional mulloway have been reported.
Beaches: Yes, the salmon are still here and a quick walk along the first few hundred metres of the southern end of Tuncurry Beach will see you hooked up. Some whiting have been caught on pipis and beach worms.
Rocks: It's usual to see a few snapper taken off rocks after dark at this time of the year, particularly in the Seal Rocks area. Mulloway are also worth targeting. Not much to report in relation to bream and tailor, but a few blackfish are still around.
Estuary: Salmon can be spun up off the end of the Tuncurry wall. A few big kings have been cruising the channel at dawn and dusk, particularly the deeper Tuncurry side. Quality flathead are being caught on the usual baits and lures, with one local catching and releasing a 105cm model just up from the bridge. Well done, Col. Some whiting have been caught but it's still early in the season. The bream are spreading out and are now establishing themselves in the rivers for the summer season. Plenty of rain over the last few months should see a good bass season to come.
Lloyd Campbell, Great Lakes Tackle 6554 9541

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