Weekly Report 19/10/12

Brad & Lisa Andrew
Great Lakes Tackle
Shop 1, 1-9 Manning St (Cnr Kent St)
Tuncurry 2428
Ph 6554 9541
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Tony Zann
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Joined: Fri Dec 19, 2008 1:21 pm

Weekly Report 19/10/12

Post by Tony Zann » Fri Oct 19, 2012 2:45 pm

Estuary: Another week of good catches of flathead and whiting throughout the lake. Flathead have been busily taking soft plastics along the southern edge of Tern Island plus right along the channel bordering Cockatoo Island. Quality bream are schooling along the back of Tuncurry Resort. Whiting are increasing in numbers but are still down in the lake around The Step. Divers tell me that the Tuncurry Breakwall has plenty of school jew near the baths. Mud crabs have started to fill traps laid in Beaky Bay or up in the Wallamba River. A few bass are being caught up at Nabaic.
Rock: A few groper down along the shore at McBrides Beach happily taking crabs. A few guys have fished Charlottes Head over the last week and have reported that sharks are everywhere and those that did land the odd fish without sharing it below the surface were happy with catches of good drummer and large bream.
Offshore: Not much reports in this week other than the odd bottom bouncer getting plenty of flathead, snapper and mixed reef rubbish.
Beach: Plenty of jewfish along most beaches. Michael and Justin Schultz fished Seven Mile Beach last Friday and Saturday night for 10 fish from 65cm to 87cm. All were caught on beach worms balled up or fillets of slimy mackerel. By-catch was bream up to 46cm. Further north along Diamond Beach and as far as Old Bar is producing similar results.
Brad & Lisa Andrew,
Great Lakes Tackle
Shop 23, 29 Manning Street (Bi-Lo Plaza)
TUNCURRY NSW 2428
Phone/Fax: 02 6554 9541

Spiney
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Joined: Fri Jul 08, 2011 8:48 pm

Re: Weekly Report 19/10/12

Post by Spiney » Fri Oct 19, 2012 4:58 pm

Justin and Michael Schultz should be aware of the current status of Mulloway in NSW, overfished. Please read the report .http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets ... lloway.pdf
Possibly the fish were released however revival rates can be low.After success on a Friday night I fail to see why a fisher would return the next night
to catch more of the same. If fishers continue to take the max bag limit just because there is one then as in the case of Mulloway the size and bag limit will be reduced. It is possible there will be a total ban or possibly one fish over 70cms allowed. If the fish were retained what do you do with all that food?

Tony Zann
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Re: Weekly Report 19/10/12

Post by Tony Zann » Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:27 am

Spiney: Brad has spoken with Justin and Michael Schultz, who told him that they kept two fish and released the others in good condition. The 10 fish were caught over 2 nights and not 10 in one night. Regardless, they were within the current law to catch 10 in one night – see http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fisheries/rec ... g-and-size.
You say of released mulloway, 'however revival rates can be low'. Survival also can and often is very high – see Broadhurst et al in http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/research/area ... s/2007/712 Barotrauma is the major cause for mortality in released mulloway, hardly likely in shore-caught fish.
I hope you have made a submission for the mulloway discussion paper.
The deadline for submissions has been extended until November 13.

Spiney
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Jul 08, 2011 8:48 pm

Re: Weekly Report 19/10/12

Post by Spiney » Mon Oct 22, 2012 7:40 pm

Thanks Tony good to see the Fishers mentioned are aware of all the regulations and are releasing fish. Yes I submitted to the Mulloway discussion a few weeks ago. I have read many reports on fish survival and agree barotrauma is a major cause for mortality however I understand no studies have been carried out on rates of fish survival caught in turbulant waters such as from rocks or beach. I would suggest any fish caught from a beach would suffer more stress (Seven Mile Beach is generally turbulant). Again as you are aware survival rates are also dependent on where the fish has been hooked and what type of hook is used.As these fish were caught on baited hooks as opposed to lures it is likely the hook may have been injested. If the fishers caught say five Mulloway the first night I still wonder why two obviously skillfull fishers would bother returning the next night to catch another five? Would not landing one fish of the size mentioned (which is a submission option) be satisfactory? Also, again as you say say the survival rate is high, say 70%, it is still possible one fish will die. We cannot allow this option for Mulloway.

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