Weekly Report 29 Apr 08

Water Tower Bait & Tackle
10 Ernest St, Manly
Ph: (07) 3396 1833
www.watertowerbaitandtackle.com

Spero: sperok@ozemail.com.au
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Brad
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Weekly Report 29 Apr 08

Post by Brad » Tue Apr 29, 2008 3:37 pm

A few early morning opportunities to get out into the bay over the last week and occasionally further afield. Many anglers who had trips planned for Anzac Day changed their mind and plans at the last minute as the weather report indicated winds to well over 20 knots for most of the day. Those who went early managed to get a few hours in but if you stayed out too long then you would have had a rough trip home.

The Brisbane River is receiving a lot of pressure these days with anglers targeting species such as threadfin, mulloway, snapper, flathead, bream and mud crabs right along its length. Many are starting to venture well up the river from the mouth with threadfin in particular being caught as far up as Mount Crosby. The section from the Gateway Bridge to the mouth receives the most pressure but continues to produce a steady stream of fish for anglers with good luring techniques or good bait positioning with live mullet, prawns and herring. Threadfin, mulloway and snapper are the target for many but flathead, bream, estuary cod, grunter, trevally, tailor and jacks are also encountered regularly. I fished out of my kayak around the ledges in the lower reaches for a few hours late last Monday afternoon and managed half a dozen legal tailor on Jackal Mask 70.

Mud Island has been both popular and productive for anglers targeting snapper, sweetlip and other species over the last few weeks. Most are using plastics and other lures around the ledges and rubble areas on the eastern and northern sides. Snapper to 7kg have been caught on these artificials as well as sweetlip, estuary cod and others. Baits have also been working well for those with good presentation. Drifting with lightly weighted baits has gained popularity as it produces a more natural presentation than having a bait weighted on the bottom which is often spinning in the current. There have been plenty of trevally caught in the shallows in the last week and anglers pre-fishing for the Tinnie and Tackle show bream competition were continually hooking them, much to their disgust. Plenty of good bream to well over 1kg have been caught in the shallows, especially on small surface lures. This is probably due to the numbers of hardiheads, a favored food source for the bream, which have been around of late in these margins.Tailor are still being caught around the Bribie island Bridge at night with lightly weighted pillies, whitebait, hardiheads and strip baits working well. Some anglers have also been doing well on small lures and even flies. A few quality snapper to 3.1kg have been reported.The Jumpinpin area has produced a few mulloway for anglers over the last few weeks however you have to be very lucky to be in the right spot at the right time. Both live baits and soft plastics have worked on jew to around 10kg.

Plenty of flathead are still being caught around the estuaries of late with most in the 35cm to 55cm class. A few quality fish to over 90cm have been reported, with most of these caught and released by anglers specifically targeting them with soft plastics in the gutters at the backs of prominent banks on the rising tide. A few school mackerel are still being caught around the beacons in the northern bay and also in the top end of the Rous Channel. Drifting with pillies has worked in both of these areas but jigging with chrome slugs and slices has been popular around the beacons. Trolling a No.3 Halco Barra Drone in the top end of the Rous channel behind a paravane is always a good offering if there is a few mackerel about.

Schools of small tunas and a few better quality longtails have been randomly scattered throughout the bay and also up along the front of Bribie Island. They have been fairly hard to approach in most instances however a few have been caught by anglers with enough experience to predict their movements. Being ready to fire a cast off and within casting distance when they surface will put you in with the maximum chance for success. From there it is just a case of hoping that your offering is to their liking on the day. There are still some good schools of prawns to be found in the Brisbane River, Logan River and other systems. A few hours with a cast net can yield you the maximum 10litres of prawns, which will make you popular with your seafood loving friends and your bait scavenging mates.
May your bait be nervous. Gordon Macdonald.

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