Report 11/10/19

Mal McKinlay
malcolmmckinlay0@gmail.com
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Nicole Penfold
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Report 11/10/19

Post by Nicole Penfold » Fri Oct 11, 2019 4:30 pm

Gone are the days when you could rock up to the Maroochy river, throw in a line with a piece of something dead on your hook and expect your target species to be lined up ready to commit suicide. Depleted fish stocks by overfishing, over population and pollution have all taken their toll to the point where you must plan and prepare each fishing trip well, to achieve a good result. It might just be a simple combination of moon phases, tides and type of lures/bait you are going to use that make the difference. The more things you take into consideration when planning your fishing trips, the better chance you have of not returning home disappointed. The amount of human traffic on the river now has made all species very man-shy and cagey…particularly the big whiting.

My last fair dinkum trip was a couple of days after the September New moon. As usual I fished the run-out tide with soldier crabs and had to be very patient and persistent to put a decent feed together. The crabs were out after only 3 hours of the run back leaving me 4 hours to the bottom of the tide. I caught some reasonable whiting around the 30cm mark early in the piece but then could not muster up even a nibble, for ages. Using 3 rods all loaded with crabs, I moved around a half dozen times trying the undulations and washouts searching for those elusive big whiting. With only 45 mins to go till slack water, I was resigned to the fact that there were not going to be any more to take home. Just when I was about to pack up, there was a twitch of one of my rod tips and hey presto! Back in business. After working a solid fish halfway to the boat, one of the 2 remaining rods went off. Busy with the fish at hand, all I could do was stick my foot on the butt of the rod (so it didn’t go over the side) as line peeled off at a great rate of knots. Quickly dropping a 36cm whiting on the floor of my boat I grabbed the other rod which was still connected to a solid fish and you guessed it…the remaining rod almost leapt over the back of the boat as line peeled off. So there you have it, for almost 3 hours I sat there like a stale bottle of p#*#s and then ended up with a triple hook-up on big whiting. Was it patience? Because I was prepared to sit it out…Persistence? Because I kept on doing the things that I know bring results? Or just pure arse? Only the Fishing Gods know!

A welcome 100mls of rain at the end of September has given the river some nice dirty colour back. While it was not enough for a full flush out, it should still improve the fishing leading up to the October 13 full moon. From all reports there are some very big flathead ranging up to 85cm oversizes being caught at all the likely places throughout the river on plastics and live baits. For you keen flathead fishos this period around the Full moon should not be missed. My only hope is that the northerly winds which have been very strong all this month let up for a couple of days in the next week so I can give the “elbow slappers” a nudge with some soldier crabs.

Remember, on the incoming tide as the current starts to pick up pace, the big whiting will work their way out of the deeper channels up over the sand banks with the rising water looking for food. Anchor well away from your target area in deeper water and cast into the fast running shallows. Once the sandbanks are well and truly covered anchor out in the middle of the bank and cast in all directions (this is when 3 rods work very well) until you hopefully locate a feeding school. Cast as far from the boat as you can because the water will be very clear and the big whiting will see you with ease and stay well out of reach (why night fishing for whiting comes into its own).

STOP PRESS! Fished run out tide with soldier crabs 4 days before Full moon nailed 8 great whiting from 30cms to 37cms (see photo) So get to it, they’re waiting for you.

For more info about anything fishing, contact me on malcolmmckinlay0@gmail.com. Good luck!

Mal McKinlay

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